April 2016

Wild Food Spotlight: Maple Blossoms


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First published April 27, 2016 Wriiten by Emily van Lidth de Jeude

Last year for the Earth Day Bulletin issue I began a series called “Earth Day Every Day”, where I explored the island and talked about my discoveries. That year has come full circle, and it’s time for this series to evolve, too. I’d like to share some foraging delights with you! So, every couple of months for the next year, I’ll explore a seasonal wild food opportunity that we can easily find here on Bowen.

One of the most iconic and bountiful plants we have here is the bigleaf maple. As you walk through the springtime coniferous forest you can see a maple a long way off, as it’s brilliant leaves catch and hold the sunlight – chartreuse against the deeper greens of hemlock, cedar, fir and spruce. Even its bulky-looking trunk and often sprawling limbs seem to burst with vivid colour: In early- to mid-spring the moss that covers them is a vibrant rich green, punctuated only with the deep grey-brown and white of the bark, and sometimes with haphazard fields of licorice fern.

Look out to the ends of those sprawling branches, reaching umbrella-like over your head, and if you’re there at the right moment you’ll see it’s blossoms. Maples’ blooming times vary according to their geographic location, elevation, and situation in the forest. Although as I write this most of our local maples have finished blooming for the year, if you explore a bit you’re likely to find a few still going strong.

A maple blossom cluster is referred to as a raceme, due to the fact that many flowers hang off a central axis (or stem) at approximately equal lengths and distances. The flowers develop first at the point closest to the branch, and successively out to the end of the raceme. Therefore, if you pick a raceme at the height of its development and sample it at various points along the stem, you’ll notice that it has various different flavours. (Note: Maples are as delicious to insects as they are to humans! Before you eat it, check the blossom for flies, aphids, ants, etc. and knock them off.) Now start tasting. Any closed or barely-open flowers near the end will have a bitter, astringent taste, due to the oxalic acid which they and many other fresh wild greens contain. Further along, both the stem and the blossoms lose this sharp flavour, and have a much more pleasant, mild taste. The flowers that are in their prime even have a slight sweetness, and this is absolutely delicious in salads! Further up, and nearer the branch, the stem becomes progressively tougher, and the flowers less flavourful. Eventually, where the two pistils in the flowers have turned brown, the flowers will taste very bland, and by the time the whole flower begins shrinking, it’s more like dried leaves – not worth eating!

So now that you’ve familiarized yourself with all the different flavours of the maple blossom… what to do with it? Some people stir-fry them. I’ve heard of people battering and deep-frying them, too, but I prefer to taste them in all their glory: quiche, rice-wraps or salad!

For a quiche, simply prepare a good savoury butter crust, steam some maple blossoms until they’re wilted, and fill the crust with a mixture of the blossoms and some other sweet or mild vegetable such as fennel, mild celery, or spinach. Mix up some eggs, milk, and a bit of sea salt, and pour it over. Cheese is always an option, but I find it overpowers the maple blossoms in this case and prefer to leave it out. Bake and enjoy!

Wraps are as diverse as they are easy. Whether you use pitas, tortillas, nori or rice paper, fill it with some sweet rice, maple blossoms, and a dressing you love. It can be quick and dirty or absolutely elegant, depending on your desire and presentation.

My favourite for last: Salad! Take out the most delicious section of the racemes, and fill your salad bowl half-full of these – flowers, stem, and all. I break the stem into sections approximately one inch long. Now make up the rest of the salad with whatever mild greens you like. Butter lettuce works well, but so do many other seasonal wild plants such as salmonberry or dandelion petals, bitter-cress, or miner’s lettuce. If you grow kale year-round in your garden, it may blossom at the same time as local maples, and kale flowers are also a delicious and beautiful addition. I like to make a dressing of grape seed oil, maple syrup, and lemon juice, as well as sometimes a little salt or wholegrain mustard, depending on the ingredients in my salad. Experiment to year heart’s delight, and enjoy! I hope you love maple blossoms as much as I do.

The Bowen Island Community Foundation: Helping to Build a Stronger and More Enriching Community

  1. erwenweb

    It was back in 2004 that the Bowen Island Community Foundation first began its work and our mission today remains consistent with those initial hopes. We aim to create a capacity for improving the lives of Bowen Islanders by encouraging donations and endowments that will serve this purpose.
    In 2016 we are now fortunate to be able to administer a total of more than $1.2 million in assets; these funds are invested on Bowen Island and with the Vancouver Foundation. And we’re now able to give back about $50,000 each year to help improve the community that we all call home. We want there to be a continuing vitality in our work, as we engage with donors to support strategic initiatives that have been identified as important to our island.
    With donations received from the community… what have we done lately? Here are 10 highlights that might interest, surprise or please you.
    1. We’ve helped to fund the Garden Gateway initiative, a project that will take shape in the coming months, beautifying the entrance to our island with a dazzling array of sustainable plantings, and a raised garden rockery with seating.
    2. We provided some initial start-up funding to the Knick Knack Nook and have recently been working with the Knick Knack Re-Use it Store Society to help them with their Small Grants Program, which in 2016 will distribute $15,000 in grants to Bowen islanders, focussed on environmental and social sustainability.
    3. We recently hosted a workshop on Bowen to assist all of the Island’s non-profit organizations with the important task of statutory compliance (not the most exciting of initiatives, perhaps, but a critical part of what we all do).
    4. We’ve funded the purchase of a push-trike that will be stored next to the Library, and will make the trails of Crippen Park and elsewhere accessible for all, enabling an important connection to the nature that we have at our doorstep.
    5. We continue to act as stewards for Bowen Islanders who have provided us with generous grants of land — grants that will, in time, significantly increase both our total asset base and our ability to provide funding to a number of worthy community projects.
    6. In early March of this year we hosted the Governor General of Canada at the Kay Meek Centre in West Vancouver, along with the other Sea to Sky Community Foundations: West Vancouver, North Shore, Whistler, Sunshine Coast and Squamish.
    7. We’ve started a youth council, through the generous grant of a donor, empowering Bowen youth decision-making, and providing simultaneous learning of the values of stewardship, community service, and philanthropy.
    8. We are an entirely volunteer board, holding monthly meetings, and representing a wide range of Bowen Islanders: men and women, young and old, working and retired, relatively recent arrivals and remarkably long-term residents.
    9. We provide a range of bursaries and scholarship to Bowen Islanders every year: the Aaron Sluggett Memorial Scholarship, the Bowen Island Golf Association Junior Scholarship, the Knick Knack Nook Bursaries for Environmental Sustainability, the Maggie Cumming Legacy Fund Scholarship, and the recently announced Margaret Witty Bursary Fund.
    10. We have 13 ambassadors, a mix of outstanding Bowen Islanders who help us in building awareness and understanding of the work of the Foundation, encouraging support from within our community: Shelagh MacKinnon, Noah Pryce-Jones, Louise McIntosh, Brian Biddlecombe, Darryl Deegan, Mary Letson, Katherine Gish, Paulo Arreaga, Ted Spear, Kevin Manning, Donna Scorer, Erwen Smith — and still very much with us in spirit — the late Piers Hayes.


The Bowen Island Community Foundation
invites you to our
2016 Annual General Meeting

The Bowen Island Community Foundation’s AGM is an opportunity for us to thank our donors and supporters and showcase how philanthropy builds community. We will announce successful grant recipients, introduce the Foundations’s new Board members, and share stories of the successes you have helped us achieve over the past year.
Please join us in celebration of community!
Thursday April 21, 2016: 7 to 9 p.m.
Cates Hill Chapel
661 Carter Road, Bowen Island
www.bowenfoundation.com
Please RSVP by April 15, 2016.

 

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